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Tips for writing a synopsis.

Here’s what I know about writing a synopsis. I HATE it. I mean it. There is very little I hate in this world. I am extremely easy-going and have been called happy-go-lucky by many people, but I truly hate writing a synopsis of my own work. Other people’s work is no problem. I think it’s like that for a lot of writers. We’re too close to our own work to see it clearly.

Anyway, I tried something new with my latest manuscript. I started the way I always do, a scene by scene synopsis (15 pages, single spaced!!) Then, I made a one page list of all the points I thought were important to include, WITHOUT looking at the scene by scene. Then I wrote my synopsis from that list, NOT the scene by scene. That made it 7 pages single spaced. Then I had my sister (thank you, sister!!!!) cut it down for me. She cut it to four pages single spaced (at one AM in the morning no less!) This made it seven pages long, double spaced, which is really to long for a query letter, but oh well. It’s tight and interesting, and I really don’t think I could cut it anymore. My plot is kind of intricate. I will say this though, every other synopsis I’ve ever sent out has been no more then two pages double spaced. In fact, some places (like Harlequin) don’t want a synopsis over that, so you really, really need to try to get it cut down.

I really liked this way of doing it. It was much easier than my normal way which is to take the scene by scene and cut. How do you do your synopses?

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Parts of the Query Letter

There are three parts to the actual query letter and each part is only one paragraph. Query letters must be short. They should never, EVER be more than a page.

The first paragraph is a short intro, with one sentence that lists the title of your novel, the word count, and the genre. The second sentence should explain why you chose to query that particular agent. Personalize it if you can; agents like to know you didn’t just randomly pull their name out of a hat. If, however, the only reason you are querying them is because a search engine said that the agent represents your genre, then I would strongly suggest you leave that sentence blank. Some agents say that you don’t need to do this, that you can jump right into your query, but I will say this: 90% of the request I have gotten are from agents that received personalized queries.

The second paragraph is a short (and I mean SHORT; no more than THREE sentences) synopsis of your novel. It should read like the blurb on the back cover or jacket flap of a book; short, to the point, and most of all, interesting. We will discuss this section of the query letter on Friday.

The last paragraph of the query should have a short author bio, with any publishing credits you might have. What’s that you say? You don’t have any publishing credits? That’s okay; we’ll discuss what to put here on Monday!

And, finally, you have the closing, which I tack on to the author bio. It should read something like this: “Thank you for taking the time to consider my work. Upon your request, I would be happy to send you a partial or complete manuscript. I look forward to your response.” (You have your manuscript done, right? Because you might need to send it in IMMEDIATELY. The partial request I got the day before yesterday came only TWO HOURS after I sent the query. You need to be ready to send it out almost immediately. Some agents say they expect your manuscript within the week, but really, the sooner the better.)

Then you sign your name and include you mailing address, your phone number, your email address, and your website address if you have one. You want to give your potential agent as many ways as you can to contact them!

And that’s you’re basic query letter. Tomorrow, we’ll cover a list of do’s and don’ts for a query letter. Trust me, there are a lot of mistakes a new writer can make that will irritate an agent. Luckily, you have me, with my hard-won experience, to tell you what NOT to do. (To bad no one told me! My mistakes could fill a giant bucket!)

Vetting a Literary Agent you Think you Want to Query

Today’s post is a few days early, due to the holidays! And yes, we will still be interviewing a literary agent on Thursday! Have a wonderful week everyone! 

Remember, when you are selecting an agent, be choosy. You’re hiring THEM to work for you, even though it might seem like the other way around. Don’t just say yes because it was the only offer you got. No agent is better than a bad agent. A bad agent can take your money, negotiate a bad contract, place your manuscript at a poor choice for publisher, and screw up your publishing career for life. There are a lot of fraud agents out there. There are also agents who mean well, but just don’t have the contacts or the experience it takes to be a good agent. Some of these agents might acquire these things over the years. Those who do not will fold.

Here are some helpful tips to make sure an agent is the right one for you:

  • Never NEVER sign with an agent that charges reading fees. Yes, there are a very few legitimate agents out there that charge fees, but it is very few. Why take the chance? In fact The Association of Authors’ Representatives (AAR- the literary agents’ guild) won’t allow any of their members to charge reading fees. It’s best to avoid agents that do.
  • Double check each agent you chose to query with the list of resources below. If they’re listed with at least two, they’re probably legit.
  • Just because an agent is not a member of AAR, doesn’t mean they are not legit. To become a member, you need to make a certain number of sales within a certain time frame, which can be hard for newer agents to do until they become more established.
  • ALWAYS check submission guidelines-both with the agency AND the agent. Sometimes the agent themselves will ask for something different. A good way to check on the specific agent is to use the resources I mentioned yesterday, especially Publisher’s Marketplace. Also, QueryTracker will list in the agent’s overview if they have a blog, Twitter feed, Etc.

Also, one other tip: keep track of who you query, and which agency they are with. Many agencies frown on querying another agent within their agency if the first agent has rejected you. There’s no point in ticking off people at the very beginning of your querying process. Try to stick to their rules and submission guidelines.

Resources for vetting agents:

  • AgentQuery
  • QueryTracker.net
  • Preditors and Editors– This is the number one site for checking an agent or publishers legitimacy. ALWAYS check with them. Their rating criteria are listed here.
  • AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler: These forums are a great place to see what an agent is like to work with. There are threads on most agents, and sometimes some of their actual clients stop by and talk about what it’s like to work with them. There are also warnings posted about bad agents.
  • AAR

 

 

 

Resources for Finding a Literary Agent

When selecting an agent, you not only need to find an agent that looks at your genre of fiction, but you must also make sure they are legit. I’ve compiled many helpful resources over the last four years. To help you, my fellow writers, I’ve decided to put all that information in one place. This post turned out to actually be longer than I expected, so the resources to use for vetting agents will be posted next Tuesday.

To find agents:

  • Querytracker.net– Organize and track your query letters to agents and publishers. Other than Publisher’s Marketplace, this is the single most helpful resource I’ve come across in the querying process. You can search for agents by genre, see other writer’s comments about them, and see statistics for query response, response time, submission response time, response to certain genres. They also have an awesome system for keeping track of who you have queried, and what their response was. The only draw back is if you want to use the tracking system for more than one project, it costs $25 a year.
  • AgentQuery-Agent Query offers the largest, most current searchable database of literary agents on the web. They offer in-depth info on each agent, more so then querytracker. Also, they try to only list legit agents, so it can also be used as a source to verify an agent. (More on that tomorrow.)
  • Literary Rambles– Spotlighting children’s book authors, agents, and publishing (for YA, MG, and picture book writers) An excellent resource that targets just agents for children’s books. EXTREMELY in-depth information for each agent they spotlight. HIGHLY recommended.
  • Writer’s Market– A searchable database for agents. I used their books when I couldn’t depend on our spotty internet. I will say that I’m not sure the online subscription is worth it. You can get the same info from the first two resources I listed and for free.
  • Association of Authors’ Representatives, Inc- These agents are the best of the best. They have to be legit to belong to the AAR, and they also have to have made above a certain amount of sales. You can also search by genre here.
  • Publisher’s Marketplace-Track Deals, Sales, Reviews, Agents, Editors, News. This is an invaluable resource. This is the only place where you can see the approximate number of sales an agent has made and the approximate worth. Also, many times an individual at a big literary agency will have a page here where they ask for different submission package materials then their agency and will also give their personal email address. The only draw back is that to see the deals, you have to subscribe at $20 a month. You can subscribe to the Publisher’s Lunch newsletter, which comes once a week and is free. They will post the biggest deals of the week in there.

 

Selecting an Agent to Query

So installment two in my series about the querying process, is about how to select an agent. So there are several ways that you can go about selecting an agent. Here’s the problem. Some agents want aspiring authors to approach them because their manuscripts are similar to what they represent. However, other agents will turn you down for this very reason, because they don’t want your book competing with the ones already on their list. (“Their list”, by the way, is what they call the clients and books they represent.) I’ve had this happen to me, so I know this is true, although you don’t hear it mentioned in books on writing. The problem is, you never know which kind of agent they are until after you hear back from them.

For lack of a better place to start, I always start with agents that represent books similar to mine. The best way to do that is to look through those similar books until you find an acknowledgement page. Lots of times the author will thank her agent. Then you have an agent to query! (Tomorrow, I will talk more about how to find the agent’s email or snail mail address, how to keep track of your queries, and how to find agents that don’t have clients similar to you.)

Don’t just pick one agent; select several. If there is one agent you really really want to work with, you can query them exclusively, but most writing guide books don’t recommend this (although, I have done it). Normally I pick three or five, the best of the best, to query first. Usually, these are agents that represent famous clients, or work at big literary agencies. To put it bluntly, they are the ones I have a slim chance with.

Then after I send those out, I wait. When a rejection or request for more comes in, I send out another query. I like to send them out in batches, because then, if something seems to be not working, you can tweak it as you go, instead of exhausting all of your chances at once. You might get lucky and score an agent with your first query, but realistically, it will probably take LOTS of queries before you have a positive response. Did you know it takes, on average, one hundred queries on a single project for an unpublished author to find an agent? Don’t give up, keep trying, and keep sending them out. And in the meantime, the best way to stay busy is to start your next manuscript. If you do sign with an agent, I guarantee you that they will ask to see more examples of your work. You want to have something to show them, don’t you?

My book is published!!!!

I just found out that the print copy of my YA fantasy novel, Drive Back the Darkness, is now available!

 

You can find it at Amazon here.

You can find it at Barnes and Noble here.

 

And here is the blurb so you can see if you’re interested:

A kingdom shrouded in darkness. One girl who can save it all.

On her sixteenth birthday, Ellie Lyons discovers her entire life has been a lie. Kidnapped, she finds herself in a strange kingdom-Alladon-a kingdom she was born to rule, ruled already by those who would see her dead. The children have been imprisoned, caged and awaiting a fate Ellie can only imagine, and only she can save them. But to do so, she must master the skills of a warrior and learn to contain the magic that roars through her veins and burns everything she touches. But when Morfan, the king’s advisor, sends an assassin to kill her, Ellie finds herself falling for the dark, dangerous Devin. Though she knows her life is at stake, she can’t seem to stay away from him, even as her feelings become strong enough to scare her, and strong enough to disturb Vance, Devin’s second. Vance is the opposite of Devin-blonde, charming, seductive. But his heart holds a kernel of something darker, something that makes him dangerously unstable, especially once he realizes he has feelings for Ellie that Ellie doesn’t share…

The publication day for my first novel is set!

My novel, Drive Back the Darkness (a YA fantasy) will be published by Etopia Press on September 14th! I can hardly believe it!

The editing process was kind of grueling, but I’m almost done. We went through three rounds of edits and now my book is at copy editing. Once that’s done, I’ll get a chance to review it one more time before it goes to “proofing” (to be honest, I’m not entirely sure what that is!).  And even more exciting, sometime in the next two weeks I’ll be revealing my cover art!

On that note, if anyone wants to do interviews, author and/or book spotlights, etc. please get in touch! I even have a few e-book copies I can give away if you wish to review it (although not an unlimitated amount!). If you think you might be interested in a YA fantasy that’s being described as Cassandra Claire meets Lord of the Rings, and you have a e-book reader, let me know. I’ll see what I can do!

I also will be revealing some important agent-related news sometime this week. 😉 Stay tuned!